James Alexander Penn, 6th Mississippi Infantry; captured after Franklin in Hood’s retreat

Unknown.jpg1. Full names of soldier: James Alexander Penn
2. Rank, unit served with, etc. 2nd Sergeant, Company A/6th Mississippi Infantry
3. Any personal info about the soldier that you’re aware of.
He was born in Louisiana and at the beginning of the war we think he may have been the postmaster in Pelahatchie, MS. Family legend says that he still owned land in Pennsylvania from the orgininal land grant to William Penn but refused to go back after the war and pay taxes on it because it was Yankee territory. After the conclusion of the war, one of his daughters married a man from the north and was promptly disowned and kicked out of the family. He also previously served one enlistment in the 10th Mississippi Infantry and upon completion, enlisted into the 6th Mississippi.
4. Was he wounded at Franklin? Captured? Missing? Killed?
According to family lore, he made it through the battle unscathed but as he
was moving back down Columbia Pike to regroup with the regiment, he saw
a Union Soldier rise up and shoot him in the leg. He lay on the road into the
night before being found by his company commander who assisted him
back to the field hospital (presumably Carnton House) (This incident was
documented in H. Grady Howell’s book Going to Meet the Yankees: A
History of the Bloody Sixth Mississippi Infantry”). He refused to allow the
surgeon to amputate his leg and for the rest of his life, wore a small leather
pouch around his neck in order to keep the bone fragments that worked out
of the wound; he wanted to be buried in one hole. He was captured 3 days
later when the Union swept back through the area and sent to Ohio where
he remained as a prisoner of war until the end of the war.
5. Survive Franklin? Survive the war? See Above
6. Your exact relation?
Great Grandson (Gary D. Penn) and Great-Great Grandson (Kendall W. Penn)
7. Burial place? Holly Bush United Methodist Church, Pelahatchie, Missippi
8. Any pictures of the soldier: in uniform? Before or after the war?
Pictures taken after the war attached below.
9. Surviving letters, diaries, or documents you’re willing to share?
No letters or documents although we have a certain number of documents related to his capture and subsequent discharge as a POW, as well as census documents, any of which I’d be happy to share.
10. The email address for you to be contacted? Kendallpenn@hotmail.com
11. Permission to re-publish your info in a web-based database so others can learn about him, and possibly contact you to ask questions or share info you might desire?
Absolutely
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Regarding one of Penn’s comrades, Jacobson writes:
As the dull morning light of December 1, 1864 began to spread over Franklin just after 6 a.m., the gravity of what had transpired became horribly clear. Capt. William C. Thompson, 6th Mississippi, was still lying on the ground near Lewisburg Pike when dawn broke. He was in such pain that he “cared little” about either living or dying. Eventually someone found him and carried him to a field hospital where a doctor dug the bullet out of Thompson’s leg without chloroform. Capt. R. N. Rea, 4th Mississippi, was not wounded, but had been through his own hell. After the Federals retreated he remained in the ditch near the Carter cotton gin. 

Around 1 a.m. he got out from under “a pile of dead and wounded men” and began wandering the desolate field. It was cold, and Rea was so stiff that he “could hardly walk.” He saw lanterns moving about and campfires sprinkled across the landscape. By the time the sun came up the captain had recovered somewhat, only to have the light of day expose the great expanse of horror. Rea said it was like nothing he had ever seen, nor wished to see again. Dead and wounded were everywhere, and in his estimation one-fourth of the Rebel army had been destroyed.

Jacobson, Eric A. (2013-11-01). For Cause and Country: A Study of the Affair at Spring Hill & the Battle of Franklin (Kindle Locations 8557-8562). O’More Publishing. Kindle Edition.

Posted in Captured, Franklin casualty, Mississippi Regiments, Sgt., Survived Franklin, Survived the war, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

Orren Franklin Harrison, Company D (Kossuth Volunteers) of the 23rd Mississippi Regiment

1. Full names of soldier. Orren Franklin Harrison (sometimes mistakenly listed as Orion F. Harrison in his military file)

2. Rank, unit served with, etc. Private with CompaScreen Shot 2016-02-26 at 6.46.54 PM.pngny D (Kossuth Volunteers) of the 23rd Mississippi Regiment

3. Any personal info about the soldier that you’re aware of. None

4. Was he wounded at Franklin? Captured? Missing? Killed? Neither wounded nor captured nor KIA. I believe his regiment saw action near the Carter Cotton Gin at Franklin.
5. Survive Franklin? Survive the war? He did survive the War and lived until 1926. His death certificate lists his occupation as “Retired Farmer” and his cause of death was attributed to “Chronic Brain Softening” He was 87-years-old at the time of his death.

6. Your exact relation? – O.F. Harrison is my 2nd Great Grandfather

7. Burial place? Oak Grove Cemetery in Woodbine, Texas

8. Any pictures of the soldier: in uniform? Before or after the war? None

9. Surviving letters, diaries, or documents you’re willing to share? His Confederate pension application is attached to this email. It states that he served from September of 1861 to April of 1865.

10. The email address for you to be contacted? dazbell1968@yahoo.com

11. Permission to re-publish your info in a web-based database so others can learn about him, and possibly contact you to ask questions or share info you might desire? Yes

David Azbell
Azbell Communications, LLC
121 Coosa Street, Suite 200
Montgomery, Alabama 36104

Posted in 23 MIssissippi Infantry, Private, Survived Franklin, Survived the war, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Anthony Lee Davis Scott (A.L.D. Scott), 128th Indiana Infantry

My third Great-grandfather fought with 128th Indiana

Name: Anthony Lee Davis Scott (A.L.D. Scott)

Unit: 128th Indiana Inf. company A

Rank: 1st lieutenant

Unfortunately I don’t have much personal info on A.L.D. He survived the war and was mustered out at the end of the war April 10th 1866 in Raleigh N.C.

He passed away at the home for disabled Volunteer soldiers 1907 in Leavenworth, Kansas where he is also buried.

I have been trying to get specific information on the 128th in particular company A. For a time our family was fractured and most of oral history was lost and as far as I know no physical history remains.

If you have or know of any history on Company A I would appreciate it.

Thank you so much

John Scott
termn8r2003@yahoo.com
Fontana, Ca.

Posted in 128th Indiana Infantry, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Samuel A. Farmer, Private, Company A of the 39th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry, “Simpson Grays”, Sears Brigade

1. Full names of soldier.

Samuel A. Farmer

2. Rank, unit served with, etc.

Private, Company A of the 39th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry, “Simpson Grays”, Sears Brigade

3. Any personal info about the soldier that you’re aware of.

Samuel A. Farmer was born in GA about 1830, and as a very young child he moved with his family to Monroe County, AL. On May 15, 1850, it was there that he married Mary Ann Wright. Sam was a farmer and a “Minister of the Gospel.” He was an educated man of simple means, and he was not a slave holder. He and Mary Ann had five children: Lucinda Washington Farmer (my ancestor), Amanda Jane “Mandy” Farmer, Henry King Farmer (who became a minister also), Susan Ellender “Ellen” Farmer, and Ellfair “Ella” Farmer.

The Farmers temporarily moved to Covington County, MS about 1859, then on to Simpson County, MS the following year.

On April 5, 1862 Sam enlisted in Westville with Captain (later Major) R J. Durr for a period of 3 years. The records erroneously list his age as 22; he was 32 at the time he enlisted. His younger brother, Pvt. George Henry Farmer, served in the same unit and would have fought at Franklin as well.

4. Was he wounded at Franklin? Captured? Missing? Killed?
Sam was killed in action during the Battle of Franklin.

5. Survive Franklin? Survive the war?
No.

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Sam’s widow Mary Ann married William B. Gray in 1865.

Sam’s brother George Henry Farmer survived the war, and his name appears on the Indigent and Disabled Confederates List of 1865. He married Margaret Catherine “Kate” McLendon on January 7, 1875 in Simpson County, MS, and they had seven known children.

One of his sons, Jefferson Jackson Farmer, upon being interviewed in 1955 at the time of his 50th wedding anniversary with Ada Alphalona Coleman, proudly named his father as Confederate veteran “George Andrew Jackson Farmer.”

6. Your exact relation?
I am a third great-granddaughter of Samuel A. Farmer.

7. Burial place?
McGavock Confederate Cemetery, Section 24 – Mississippi – Grave 31

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8. Any pictures of the soldier: in uniform? Before or after the war?
No. I hope to discover one some day.

9. Surviving letters, diaries, or documents you’re willing to share?

I have very little. Please see attached copies of service cards I have found on Fold3 and a grave marker photograph which was added by “james brooks christoffersen” to Find A Grave Memorial # 6538857.

I would like to add that the Battle Flag of the 39th MS was captured by the 4th Minnesota at the Battle of Allatoona in GA on October 5, 1864, and the remnants are in the collections of the Minnesota Historical Society in St. Paul. Photo reproductions of a painting of the flag are for sale on its website. I am also attaching a copy of the photographed painting.

10. The email address for you to be contacted?
cmcsmith at bellsouth.net

11. Permission to re-publish your info in a web-based database so others can learn about him, and possibly contact you to ask questions or share info you might desire?
Yes

 

Posted in 39th Mississippi Infantry, Buried in McGavock, Killed at Franklin, Private, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

John Robert Hill, Company E of the 20th Infantry Regiment of Tennessee.

1. Full names of soldier.  John Robert Hill

2. Rank, unit served with, etc.   He served in Company E of the 20th Infantry Regiment of Tennessee.

3. Any personal info about the soldier that you’re aware of. He was born July 17, 1848 in Williamson County and  he enlisted on June 8, 1861 in Trousdale, TN.

4. Was he wounded at Franklin?  Captured?  Missing?  Killed?

5. Survive Franklin?  Survive the war? Yes he survived and lived a long life.  He was 72 years old when he died on May 9, 1921.

6. Your exact relation? He is my maternal great-grandfather.

7. Burial place? Franklin, TN

8. Any pictures of the soldier:  in uniform?  Before or after the war?  I have pictures of him before and after service, but none in his uniform.

9. Surviving letters, diaries, or documents you’re willing to share? None that I am aware of at this time.

10. The email address for you to be contacted? Lgharris57@verizon.net

11. Permission to re-publish your info in a web-based database so others can learn about him, and possibly contact you to ask questions or share info you might desire? Yes

Posted in 20th Tennessee Infantry, Direct descendant, Photo exists of soldier, Survived Franklin, Survived the war | Leave a comment

Henry Clay Wright, Co E, 21st Kentucky Infantry

Enlisted on 10/28/1861 at Camp Hobson, KY as a Private.

On 1/2/1862 he mustered into “E” Co. KY 21st Infantry

He was Mustered Out on 1/13/1866 at Louisville, KY

(Sentenced and confined to Fort Pickens, FL for six mos. hard labor)

He was listed as: AWOL 10/1/1862 (place not stated). Returned 2/28/1864 (place not stated)

After serving his prison sentence he returned to his unit and saw action in the Atlanta and Tennessee campaigns


If absent from 10/1/62 until 2/28/64 he missed action at Stones River, Missionary Ridge and Chickamauga.  Since he returned in late February 1864, he saw action with the 21st Kentucky in the Atlanta Campaign, Kennesaw Mountain, and Franklin-Nashville.

His brother-in-law, William B. Bickett, enlisted July 10, 1862 into the 6th KY Cav.

Submitted by:  Kraig McNutt (direct descendant), tellinghistory[at]yahoo.com

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Posted in 21st Kentucky Infantry, Kentucky Regiments, U.S., Survived Franklin, Survived the war, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Looking for information on James Snipes, 10th SC Infantry, supposedly killed at Franklin

Seeking information on James Snipes from Marion County, SC.  Reportedly killed in Battle of Franklin ?  Reports say he was brought home to SC for burial, but that seems doubtful to me.  I did not see him listed as buried in the cemetery in Franklin.  Reportedly 10th Regiment from SC.   Phil Snipes | snipeph[at]gmail.com


Brigade information for Franklin

Manigault’s Brigade
Brigadier General Arthur Middleton Manigault

  • 10th South Carolina Infantry
  • 19th South Carolina Infantry
  • 24th Alabama Infantry
  • 28th Alabama Infantry
  • 4th Alabama Infantry

Responses from the community

Phil, I did find this on CWD. telling history[at]yahoo.com

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The 1860 census for Marion County, SC finds a James Snipes, but he is age 60.

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The 1860 census shows a James Snipes from Chesterfield Co, SC; age 22.  He would be of military age of course.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment