Richard W. Hastings, Company F, 120th Indiana Infantry

MMy Great Great Grandfather, Richard Whitfield Hastings, was mustered into Company “F” of the 120th Regiment Indiana Infantry on January 21st, 1864. This took place at Camp Knox, near Vincennes, Indiana. He was 27 years old at the time with the rank of Private.

On March 1st, 1864 the 120th mustered in with all companys in Columbus, Indiana. Pvt Richard W Hastings was promoted to First Sergeant of Company “F” by virtue of Company Elections on March 18th.

First Sergeant Hastings was engaged at Rocky Face Ridge, and Resaca. His unit took a conspicuous part and joining in the charge which routed the enemy; in the assault of Kennesaw Mountain, and in the battle before Atlanta, July 22.

First Sergeant Hastings took part in the siege of Atlanta and in constant skirmishing until its evacuation being engaged at Jonesboro and Lovejoy’s Station. Company “F” moved in the pursuit of Hood in October as far as Summerville.

It was detached from Sherman’s army, Oct. 30, and ordered to Nashville, being in skirmishes at Columbia, and in the battle at Franklin, on Nov. 30, losing 48 in killed and wounded, Maj. Brasher being mortally wounded.

On December 10th, First Sergeant Hastings accepted a field commission and was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant of Company “F”.

The 120th took position in line of battle and took part in the battle of Nashville during Dec. 15-16, joining in the pursuit of Hood’s retreating forces, and going into camp at Clifton, Tenn.
Second Lieutenant Hastings was discharged with a physical disability on May 1st, 1865, in the field near Clifton, Tenn.

He died in Wabash County, Illinois on October 15th, 1881. Lt Hastings is buried in Antioch Cemetery near Keensburg, Illinois. GPS Coordinates: Latitude: 38.31778, Longitude: -87.90972

Submitted by Michael R. Phelps

Michael R Phelps
Co-Author,
Research and Liaison.
A Dark and Bloody Ground
PO Box 7005
Greenwood, IN 46142

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This entry was posted in 120th Indiana Infantry, Photo exists of soldier, Sgt., Stiles' Brigade, Survived Franklin, Survived the war, Union and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Richard W. Hastings, Company F, 120th Indiana Infantry

  1. Michael R Phelps says:

    My Great Great Grandfather, Richard Whitfield Hastings, was mustered into Company “F” of the 120th Regiment Indiana Infantry on January 21st, 1864. This took place at Camp . He was 27 years old at the time with the rank of Private. On March 1st, 1864 the 120th mustered in with all companys in Columbus, Indiana. Pvt Richard W Hastings was promoted to First Sergeant of Company “F” by virtue of Company Elections on March 18th.
    First Sergeant Hastings was engaged at Rocky Face Ridge, and Resaca. His unit took a conspicuous part and joining in the charge which routed the enemy; in the assault of Kennesaw Mountain, and in the battle before Atlanta, July 22.
    First Sergeant Hastings took part in the siege of Atlanta and in constant skirmishing until its evacuation being engaged at Jonesboro and Lovejoy’s Station. Company “F” moved in the pursuit of Hood in October as far as Summerville.
    It was detached from Sherman’s army, Oct. 30, and ordered to Nashville, being in skirmishes at Columbia, and in the battle at Franklin, on Nov. 30, losing 48 in killed and wounded, Maj. Brasher being mortally wounded.
    On December 10th, First Sergeant Hastings accepted a field commission and was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant of Company “F”.
    The 120th took position in line of battle and took part in the battle of Nashville during Dec. 15-16, joining in the pursuit of Hood’s retreating forces, and going into camp at Clifton, Tenn.
    Second Lieutenant Hastings was discharged with a physical disability on May 1st, 1865, in the field near Clifton, Tenn.

  2. Michael R Phelps says:

    My Great Great Grandfather, Richard Whitfield Hastings, was mustered into Company “F” of the 120th Regiment Indiana Infantry on January 21st, 1864. This took place at Camp . He was 27 years old at the time with the rank of Private. On March 1st, 1864 the 120th mustered in with all companys in Columbus, Indiana. Pvt Richard W Hastings was promoted to First Sergeant of Company “F” by virtue of Company Elections on March 18th.
    First Sergeant Hastings was engaged at Rocky Face Ridge, and Resaca. His unit took a conspicuous part and joining in the charge which routed the enemy; in the assault of Kennesaw Mountain, and in the battle before Atlanta, July 22.
    First Sergeant Hastings took part in the siege of Atlanta and in constant skirmishing until its evacuation being engaged at Jonesboro and Lovejoy’s Station. Company “F” moved in the pursuit of Hood in October as far as Summerville.
    It was detached from Sherman’s army, Oct. 30, and ordered to Nashville, being in skirmishes at Columbia, and in the battle at Franklin, on Nov. 30, losing 48 in killed and wounded, Maj. Brasher being mortally wounded.
    On December 10th, First Sergeant Hastings accepted a field commission and was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant of Company “F”.
    The 120th took position in line of battle and took part in the battle of Nashville during Dec. 15-16, joining in the pursuit of Hood’s retreating forces, and going into camp at Clifton, Tenn.
    Second Lieutenant Hastings was discharged with a physical disability on May 1st, 1865, in the field near Clifton, Tenn.
    He died in Wabash County, Illinois on October 15th, 1881. Lt Hastings is buried in Antioch Cemetery near Keensburg, Illinois. GPS Coordinates: Latitude: 38.31778, Longitude: -87.90972

  3. Michael R Phelps says:

    I didn’t finish one sentence.. lol wow…

    “This took place at Camp Knox, near Vincennes, Indiana.

    (this is in the second sentence of the article)

    Thanks Kraig!

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