Jerome Bonapart Dooley, Company H, 40th Indiana Infantry

My 3rd Great Grandfather, Pvt. Jerome Bonapart Dooley, 40th Indiana. Fourth Army Corps, Second Div. [Wagner], 2nd Brigade [Lane].

His pension records state he was wounded at Franklin.

A brief bio with photos of him can be found at: http://40thindiana.wordpress.com/page/3/

Submitted by Matthew Rector
herrrector@hotmail.com

—————

Notes:

      The regiment under my command [at Franklin] was simply used as a support for there first line; not being itself actually engaged, of course acted only a secondary part; still, I think the part was well maintained. I noticed a great  improvement in the morale of the recruits, who had reached me but a short time previous to the battle of Franklin, and found them pretty well broken in to stand about the only fire they were exposed to, that of the enemy’s artillery. My total loss was 11 men–1 killed and 10 wounded.

 

      Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

 

    H. LEAMING,  Lieut.-Col., Cmdg.
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One Response to Jerome Bonapart Dooley, Company H, 40th Indiana Infantry

  1. Jeffrey M. Graf says:

    I don’t know what battle Lt. Col. Leaming was at, but he can’t be talking about the Battle of Franklin. The 40th was in Lane’s Brigade with Conrads Brigade in the suicide line about a half mile in front of the main Union line at Franklin. Contrary to orders, Gen. Wagner refused to withdraw the 2 Brigades from their exposed position, the result of which 3,000 men were steamrolled by 28,000 men. The men retreated in disorder, followed closely by the Rebels. The Union soldiers in the main line held their fire on the approaching Rebels, out of fear of hitting their retreating comrades and the Rebels followed these poor soldiers over the wall to breach the center line. If Opdyke’s Brigade had not disobeyed Wagners’ insane order to stay on the advanced line and formed a reserve behind the main line(stopping the Rebel breakthrough), the battle could have been a Rebel victory. Wagner was condemned by his Brigade Commanders in their after-action reports and was forced to resign by Gen. Thomas shortly after the battle. I have looked at the full 40th Regimental roster and Franklin stands out in KIA’s, WIA”s, MIA’s, taken prisoners more than even Kennesaw Mt., Stone’s River, Missionary Ridge. Perhaps Lt. Col. Leaming is trying to mitigate the disaster out of loyalty to Gen. Wagner, whom he had served under for 4 years.

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